Time-lapse of a piece I did for my upcoming solo show, DIE WELT, at the Chicago Cultural Center. The opening is this Friday the 12th from 5:30 - late! Come on down! :)

» via & by Drury Brennan

Queen perform live at The Rainbow Theatre in London, 1974.

Finally after 40 years, ‘Queen: Live at the Rainbow ‘74’ will be released in September 2014 in a variety of formats all newly mixed and mastered to the highest contemporary standard. These range from a standard two CD package, a DVD, an SD Blu-ray, a gate-fold double vinyl, a quadruple vinyl boxed set, to a super deluxe collector’s edition
which will include two CDs, a DVD and Blu-Ray, a 60 page hardback book and various items of rare memorabilia.

Official press release
Watch the trailer
Pre-order

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(via surfingbrainwaves)

This Too Shall Pass (2012) by Tomorrow Machine

Independent packaging project for perishable goods:

Is it reasonable that it takes several years for a milk carton to decompose naturally, when the milk goes sour after a week? This Too Shall Pass is a series of food packaging were the packaging has the same short life-span as the foods they contain. The package and its content is working in symbiosis.

Smoothie package
Gel of the agar agar seaweed and water are the only components used to make this package. To open it you pick the top. The package will wither at the same speed as its content. It is made for drinks that have a short life span and needs to be refrigerated, fresh juice, smoothies and cream for example.

Rice Package
Package made of biodegradable beeswax. To open it you peel it like a fruit. The package is designed to contain dry goods, for example grains and rice.

Oil package
A package made of caramelized sugar, coated with wax. To open it you crack it like an egg. When the material is cracked the wax no longer protects the sugar and the package melts when it comes in contact with water. This package is made for oil-based food.

– via worclip

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Lavoisier is having none of your shit. – oxidoreductase

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.
In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.
Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 
I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.– mermaidskey

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– hemipelagicdredger

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.
oxidoreductase

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

mermaidskey

more likeimage

hemipelagicdredger

(via odins-one-eyed-fuck)